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CompleteMartialArts.com - Suttree


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Manufacturer: Vintage
Average Customer Rating: Average rating of 4.5/5Average rating of 4.5/5Average rating of 4.5/5Average rating of 4.5/5Average rating of 4.5/5

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Binding: Paperback
Dewey Decimal Number: 813.54
EAN: 9780679736325
ISBN: 0679736328
Label: Vintage
Manufacturer: Vintage
Number Of Items: 1
Number Of Pages: 480
Publication Date: 1992-05-05
Publisher: Vintage
Release Date: 1992-05-05
Studio: Vintage

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Editorial Reviews:

By the author of Blood Meridian and All the Pretty Horses, Suttree is the story of Cornelius Suttree, who has forsaken a life of privilege with his prominent family to live in a dilapidated houseboat on the Tennessee River near Knoxville.  Remaining on the margins of the outcast community there--a brilliantly imagined collection of eccentrics, criminals, and squatters--he rises above the physical and human squalor with detachment, humor, and dignity.


Spotlight customer reviews:

Customer Rating: Average rating of 1/5Average rating of 1/5Average rating of 1/5Average rating of 1/5Average rating of 1/5
Summary: suttree
Comment: Incomprehensible..Boring, A waste of money..
I you want to spend time trying to unravel what the heck this man is trying to say, then do so..I gave it my best shot and in disgust tossed it into the waste basket.

Customer Rating: Average rating of 3/5Average rating of 3/5Average rating of 3/5Average rating of 3/5Average rating of 3/5
Summary: McCarthy, Simplified.
Comment: Suttree is much more simplistic than The Border Trilogy, and No Country for Old Men. Consequently, the language is not as beautiful. McCarthy, in writing Suttree, was only honing his skill towards greatness.

Customer Rating: Average rating of 1/5Average rating of 1/5Average rating of 1/5Average rating of 1/5Average rating of 1/5
Summary: Brazenly Anti-Plot
Comment: I read this book because it is on the Modern Library's Top 100 List. This is by far the worst novel I've ever read in my life! There is no plot, it is boring, and very very long. It seems like the author couldn't make up his mind what to write about and just randomly threw in different scenes that could've made up a series of completely different stories. It's like reading a book of short stories where each story starts and then abruptly switches to the beginning of something completely different and never gets to the end or climax of any of the stories. Again NO plot!

Not to mention he seems to have a vulgar and disgusting agenda with this book. The characters are dirty, worthless, transients, that I neither feel for, nor want to read about, and their random acts of violence are dispicable. I don't think he writes beautifully in any sense of the word, he is excessive in his descriptive narrative. It's boring and makes no sense. This is the first book I've ever read that I literally wanted to burn when I was through reading it.

The fact that this novel was ever published is surprising to me, let alone the fact that people actually buy it, and like it enough to put it on the Modern Library's list. Personally I disliked every aspect of his writing.

I think that in our day and age something is widely considered "profound" if it makes no sense. Splatters of paint are a "masterpiece" painting. Unrecognizable shapes are a brilliant sculpture. A urinal plucked and hung on the wall becomes a great work of art, this book reminds me of that urinal.

Customer Rating: Average rating of 5/5Average rating of 5/5Average rating of 5/5Average rating of 5/5Average rating of 5/5
Summary: Great!
Comment: This is an amazing book. I finished it in 4 days and started all over again. Not for children though.

Customer Rating: Average rating of 5/5Average rating of 5/5Average rating of 5/5Average rating of 5/5Average rating of 5/5
Summary: Fantastic.
Comment: "Mr Suttree...the new day commences and contrary to conduct befitting a person of your station you betook yourself to various low places within the shire of McAnally and there did squander several ensuing years in the company of thieves, derelicts, miscreants, pariahs, poltroons, spalpeens, curmudgeons, clotpolls, murderers, gamblers, bawds, whores, trulls, brigands, topers, tosspots, sots and archsots, lobcocks, smellsmocks, runagates, rakes, and other assorted and felonious debauchees."

Such are the characters and such is the language of Suttree, a novel about Cornelius Suttree, who in 1952 has abandoned his life of privilege because of his relationship with his father and has opted instead for the life of a river rat, living in a shoddy houseboat under the bridges of Knoxville, Tennessee and eeking out a living as a fisherman. When not checking his lines, he spends his time drinking, fighting, in jail, wandering through the woods alone, and hanging out with the dredges of society.

The world of Sutree is an underbelly of grime and muck, populated by a violent, immoral, idiotic but usually likable cast of characters. Suttree himself is one of the more noble of them, but the most enjoyable is a hare-brained schemer named Harrogate. Suttree meets the "country mouse" (as he calls Harrogate) in the workhouse after Harrogate is arrested for engaging in repeated carnal relations with watermelons. Later in the book Suttree finds him shooting poisoned meat from a slingshot, killing bats which he then delivers to the local hospital for a bounty ($1 per bat), and then again Suttree discovers him in a cave unconscious after his plan to dynamite a tunnel under the city and into a bank vault goes awry.

It takes awhile to care for Suttree, partly because he doesn't seem to care about much himself. But by the end of the novel, McCarthy has given us enough, in small pieces here and there, that we have in Suttree a deep, well-rounded and sympathetic, if flawed, character. All the big names have been thrown around by critics describing this book--Twain, Joyce, Steinbeck, Faulkner--but I feel like McCarthy is his own. Just as quintessentially American as Twain or Steinbeck, but wholly original. I'm actually surprised to say that I may like this book better than some of his later, more sparsely written novels. It's really really good.



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