Home : Who's Who : Information : Entertainment : Publications : Fitness : Directory : Multimedia : MMA : Forums : Links

 

CompleteMartialArts.com - The Short Stories of F. Scott Fitzgerald: A New Collection

The Short Stories of F. Scott Fitzgerald: A New Collection
List Price: $19.00
Our Price: $12.92
Your Save: $ 6.08 ( 32% )
Availability: Usually ships in 24 hours
Manufacturer: Scribner
Average Customer Rating: Average rating of 4.0/5Average rating of 4.0/5Average rating of 4.0/5Average rating of 4.0/5Average rating of 4.0/5

Buy it now at Amazon.com!

Binding: Paperback
Dewey Decimal Number: 813.52
EAN: 9780684804453
ISBN: 068480445X
Label: Scribner
Manufacturer: Scribner
Number Of Items: 1
Number Of Pages: 800
Publication Date: 1995-09-20
Publisher: Scribner
Studio: Scribner

Related Items

Editorial Reviews:

Today F. Scott Fitzgerald is better known for his novels, but in his own time, his fame rested squarely on his prolific achievement as one of America's most gifted writers of stories and novellas. Now, a half-century after the author's death, the premier Fitzgerald scholar and biographer, Matthew J. Bruccoli, has assembled in one volume the full scope of Fitzgerald's best short fiction: forty-three sparkling masterpieces, ranging from such classic novellas as "The Rich Boy," "May Day," and "The Diamond as Big as the Ritz" to his commercial work for the Saturday Evening Post and its sister "slicks."

For the reader, these stories will underscore the depth and extraordinary range of Fitzgerald's literary talents. Furthermore, Professor Bruccoli's illuminating preface and introductory headnotes establish the literary and biographical settings in which these stories now shine anew with brighter luster than ever.


Spotlight customer reviews:

Customer Rating: Average rating of 5/5Average rating of 5/5Average rating of 5/5Average rating of 5/5Average rating of 5/5
Summary: F Scott Fitzawesome
Comment: F Scott Fitzgerald is the greatest American author of the 20th Century. It's easy to see why with this collection of short stories. What I enjoy best about this book is seeing the experimentation of Fitzgerald's writing from one story to the next. It's fun to see the literary and thematic chances that he took as his career progressed. You should buy this book.

Customer Rating: Average rating of 3/5Average rating of 3/5Average rating of 3/5Average rating of 3/5Average rating of 3/5
Summary: Deadline Looming....
Comment: It was, after all, the Great Cham, Samuel Johnson, who said that "Nobody but a blockhead ever wrote for anything but money"-I don't believe this is true. I don't even believe Johnson that "harmless drudge" as he describes himself in the dictionary he spent several unrewarded years compiling believed it either. But it does, anent Fitzgerald and his stories, as comprised in this book, come to mind. Simply put, Fitzgerald was a much better short story writer than a novelist. Indeed, one can argue that Fitzgerald was not a novelist at all and was, as he described himself, a writer who wanted to "preach at people." In any event, the Johnsonian dictum cited above seems to apply to Fitzgerald: He wrote much better when under some pecuniary deadline than otherwise. I am not so much concerned here as to whether "Fitzgerald" was a "great" writer or not. But he was certainly no Keats or Shelley, as one reviewer eulogizes.

There is a gossamer quality to Fitzgerald's prose that, it seems to me, is mistaken for lyricism. Pick up any page of Fitzgerald's contemporary, Thomas Wolfe, (specifically Look Homeward, Angel) and you'll see the difference. -What this lightness of touch amounts to in his novels and stories, for the most part, is that the characters come off as two-dimensional, and when Scott tries to delve deeper for what he called "psychological moments" or whatever, the reader is left with a gracefully penned alternative two-dimensional figure. It's quite frustrating. ----All this is to say, though I'm not a great fan of Fitzgerald's writing, some of these stories are worth any reader's while, and I shall list them:

"Bernice Bobs Her Hair" p.25

"Dice, Brassknuckles & Guitar" p.237

"Love In The Night" p.302

"A Short Trip Home" p.372

"The Swimmers" p.495

"A New Leaf" p.634

"Afternoon of An Author" p.734

"The Lost Decade" p.747

These stories stand out for one of two reasons, they lack the strain put on the reader by the gossamer sketching described above, or, for a few of them, Fitzgerald actually manages to pull it off - a powerful or haunting story touching the human condition.

Sorry, F. Scott acolytes, but only three stars for these pearls amidst the Period-Writing paste.


Customer Rating: Average rating of 5/5Average rating of 5/5Average rating of 5/5Average rating of 5/5Average rating of 5/5
Summary: Beautiful writing
Comment: The use of language doesn't get much better than this. Each sentence is a work of art and a pleasure to read. I smile as I read. The stories themselves are so clearly placed in a post-WWI setting that they are a glimpse into life in the 1920's - as, I believe, Fitgerald wanted to show. Also, to me, any Fitgerald work edited or or explained by Matthew Bruccoli is informative & interesting.

The above, though, is to those who like Fitzgerald. To me, his is special beyond many other authors' writing. If you've never enjoyed his work before, this book won't change that. If you've never read anything by Fitzgerald, I would suggest starting with "The Great Gatsby."

Customer Rating: Average rating of 5/5Average rating of 5/5Average rating of 5/5Average rating of 5/5Average rating of 5/5
Summary: Fitzgerald's Stories--Short and Sweet
Comment: F. Scott Fitzgerald wrote tons of stories during his lifetime--something around 134, total. This book, however, contains the most elite chunk of those writings. To start, "Bernice Bobs Her Hair" is one of Fitzgerald's most-read stories. I have read it myself, but have found better ones. "The Ice Palace", for instance, has a remarkable ability to make its readers walk away saying "I relate to this!". "May Day", my personal favorite, is about people on top sinking to the bottom, and people on the bottom sinking lower. At least, that's the abridged summary, there's alot more to it then that. "Winter Dreams" is another winner, but I liked "May Day" better. All of his stories generally pertain to Fitzgerald's masterpiece, "The Great Gatsby". In other words, they all contain that one character desperately searching for the missing piece of the puzzle. That can be either the one element that would make his/her life complete, or launch it in a different direction. Why does he do this so well? Because this theme is partially autobiographical. Fitzgerald started off at Princeton where he made hardly any friends. Then he moved on to the Southern US when he joined the army. This is where he met Zelda. But Zelda did not want to marry him due to his lack of money. So Fitzgerald began writing in persuit of the dollar to support Zelda. His plan worked and he was a big success...for a while. Then he moved, in despiration, to Europe in order to gain a better status. This didn't work either and he ended up dying in Hollywood at age 40. His wife, Zelda, went mad and was institutionalized a few years prior. This should be kept in mind as you read his short stories, there are definate parallels!

Customer Rating: Average rating of 4/5Average rating of 4/5Average rating of 4/5Average rating of 4/5Average rating of 4/5
Summary: A wonderful, quick read
Comment: I've read almost all of F Scott Fitzgerald's work and I was delighted to find this compelation of short stories. I read this book alomst four years ago and I can still remember the characters and details of each story - my favorite was Diamond as Big as the Ritz. Try it out and you will not be dissapointed!


Buy it now at Amazon.com!





Top 50 Martial Arts Topsites List

Copyright © 1999-2008 CompleteMartialArts.com. All rights reserved.
powered by My Amazon Store Manager v 2.0, © Stringer Software Solutions