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CompleteMartialArts.com - A Moveable Feast


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Manufacturer: Scribner
Average Customer Rating: Average rating of 4.5/5Average rating of 4.5/5Average rating of 4.5/5Average rating of 4.5/5Average rating of 4.5/5

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Binding: Paperback
Dewey Decimal Number: 818.5203
EAN: 9780684824994
ISBN: 068482499X
Label: Scribner
Manufacturer: Scribner
Number Of Items: 1
Number Of Pages: 219
Publication Date: 1996-05-29
Publisher: Scribner
Studio: Scribner

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Editorial Reviews:

Published posthumously in 1964, A Moveable Feast remains one of Ernest Hemingway's most beloved works. It is his classic memoir of Paris in the 1920s, filled with irreverent portraits of other expatriate luminaries such as F. Scott Fitzgerald and Gertrude Stein; tender memories of his first wife, Hadley; and insightful recollections of his own early experiments with his craft. It is a literary feast, brilliantly evoking the exuberant mood of Paris after World War I and the youthful spirit, unbridled creativity, and unquenchable enthusiasm that Hemingway himself epitomized.


Spotlight customer reviews:

Customer Rating: Average rating of 5/5Average rating of 5/5Average rating of 5/5Average rating of 5/5Average rating of 5/5
Summary: Young Hemingway...
Comment: Interesting book of short stories, published after his death, that deal with the time Hemingway spent in Paris in the 1920s. He writes of the people he knew there (Gertrude Stein, Ezra Pound and many others), his method and execution of writing (including many explanations about his particular style), his love for the city of Paris and that of his first wife (he was quite the romantic!). A great glimpse into the young Hemingway.

Customer Rating: Average rating of 5/5Average rating of 5/5Average rating of 5/5Average rating of 5/5Average rating of 5/5
Summary: An Opinion Humbly Submitted
Comment: It seems incredibly vain to write a review of A Moveable Feast. People study it in college, dissertations have been written and PhD.'s awarded. But Amazon gives everybody a shot at anything and if there's any virtue in that approach, it may be that it allows for small-scale observations like this one:

A person learning to write should read this book attentively. The simple encouragement about writing 'one true sentence' is good for the soul. Got block? Just write one true sentence: you can and you should. You, writer should also pay attention to the value of writing about something when you are away from it and when you've known it well enough.
And then there's the whole bit about ornament and flourishes. Hemingway says that he cut them all away, but of course that's the furthest thing from the truth. A Moveable Feast is full of flourishes in the form of details that are sparingly crafted and added to the narrative because they make the whole thing more alive. You might find that you've forgotten everything he said about Zelda but remember vividly the details of heating a small rented room in Paris.

It's hard to read this book without wanting to put it down and tell someone something about a vividly remembered detail of your life: the smell of a clean fuzzy dog or the feeling of standing on the deck of a ship as it goes east through the North Atlantic in winter. And of course, you'll want to do it with one true sentence.


Lynn Hoffman, author of Bang Bang

Customer Rating: Average rating of 5/5Average rating of 5/5Average rating of 5/5Average rating of 5/5Average rating of 5/5
Summary: Hemingway at his Best
Comment: My personal reading of Hemingway has spanned a lifetime. This short "memoir" aside from 'Islands in the Stream' and 'The Oldman and the Sea', has to be one of the top ten "must reads" for any Hemingway reader...or any reader.

Why?

A Movable Feast describes that (R)omantic time after WW1 in Paris when creative life exploded in all its forms: Picasso in art, James Joyce, F. S. Fitzgerald, Gertrude Stein, Ezra Pound; surealism, cubism and ultimately expressionism. Writers travelled to Paris or more so, 'gravitated' to the beautiful city and worked, starved and immersed themselves in their particular art froms.

This is a 'tale' of the 'Starving Artist', as Hemingway descibes his hunger - the smells of bread along the small streets, his belly taking over while his mind focuses entirely on food - though the writing continued no matter his lack of food or his beloved drink.

For example: "Chapter 8" "...you got very hungry when you did not eat enough in Paris because all the bakery shops had such good things in the windows and people ate outside at tables on the sidewalk so that you saw a smelled the food." (p. 50)

A Movable Feast is a general description of Hemingway's experiences without the details of gossip of the famous and infamous people he encountered.

As the author writes at the beginning: "For reasons sufficient to the writer, many places, people, observations and impressions have been left out of this book. Some were secrets and some were known by everyone and everyone has written about them and will undoubtless write more." (Preface)

Fair enough.

In a biography of James Joyce, and interesting event occurred, (not mentioned in this text). Hemingway, in awe of the Irish genius, invites him to a famous bar which he and Fitzgerald had been drinking since the morning. The dapper Joyce arrives late in the afternoon, reserved as always, when some Parisian ruffian begins to insult Joyce. In true Hemingway character, he duly throws the ruffian out the front window. If memory serves, Joyce promptly bid his adieu and left. This is without doubt Hemingway in true (drunken) character.

This is an unreliable historical document but the perspective of a man writing about a time in his life that has he will never forget because of the time and personalities he met.

One of Hemingway's best and most entertaining.

In Hemingway's own words:

"If you are lucky enough to have lived in Paris as a young man, then wherever you go for the rest of your life, it stays with you, for Paris is a movable feast." (A letter to a friend - 1950)


Customer Rating: Average rating of 2/5Average rating of 2/5Average rating of 2/5Average rating of 2/5Average rating of 2/5
Summary: read sun also rises
Comment: Guess what? A lot of people really like Hemingway. There are those who have never studied or even read another great author of the 20th century who has read Hem. This book was published after his death and I wonder if this wasn't something he wrote for his own kind of fun to attack and belittle everyone he knew in those years. Almost a practice writing exercise with malicious intent: read it carefully, F. Scott is famously viscously trashed but so is every single person he meets. My feeling is that if he was in his right mind - if you were to read anything about his last years he was in very bad shape - he would have destroyed this before he killed himself.

Customer Rating: Average rating of 5/5Average rating of 5/5Average rating of 5/5Average rating of 5/5Average rating of 5/5
Summary: The Writer's Life
Comment: A Moveable Feast, Hemingway's memoir of his early days in Paris, is nearly bursting with rich, poignant details of what it was like to be young and hopeful and excited. It's all there--Sylvia Beach, Gertrude Stein, F. Scott Fitzgerald, the horse chestnut trees in bloom. Perhaps more than the reminiscenses of actual people and places, however, is Hemingway's sense of how good it was to be young. At times, you almost feel that Hemingway's heart was breaking as he recalls the beauty of his youth. Whether the stories are fact or fiction doesn't matter--Hemingway creates an aching poetry in these lovely, long ago days in Paris.

Donald Gallinger is the author of The Master Planets


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