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CompleteMartialArts.com - In the Dojo: A Guide to the Rituals and Etiquette of the Japanese Martial Arts

In the Dojo: A Guide to the Rituals and Etiquette of the Japanese Martial Arts
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Manufacturer: Weatherhill
Average Customer Rating: Average rating of 4.0/5Average rating of 4.0/5Average rating of 4.0/5Average rating of 4.0/5Average rating of 4.0/5

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Binding: Paperback
Dewey Decimal Number: 796.80952
EAN: 9780834805729
ISBN: 0834805723
Label: Weatherhill
Manufacturer: Weatherhill
Number Of Items: 1
Number Of Pages: 208
Publication Date: 2006-09-26
Publisher: Weatherhill
Release Date: 2006-09-26
Studio: Weatherhill

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Editorial Reviews:

Beginning students in Japanese martial arts, such as karate, judo, aikido, iaido, kyudo, and kendo, learn that when they are in the dojo (the practice space), they must don their practice garb with ritual precision, address their teacher and senior students in a specific way, and follow certain unwritten but deeply held codes of behavior. But very soon they begin to wonder about the meaning behind the traditions, gear, and relationships in the dojo.

In this collection of lively, detailed essays, Dave Lowry, one of the most well-known and respected swordsmen in the United States, illuminates the history and meaning behind the rituals, training costumes, objects, and relationships that have such profound significance in Japanese martial arts, including the dojo space itselfthe teacher-student relationshipthe act of bowingwhat to expect—and what will be expected of you—when you visit a dojothe training weaponsthe hakama (ceremonial skirt) and dogi (practice uniform)the Shinto shrine

Authoritative, insightful, and packed with fascinating stories from his own experience, In the Dojo provides a wealth of information that beginning students will pore over and advanced students will treasure.


Spotlight customer reviews:

Customer Rating: Average rating of 5/5Average rating of 5/5Average rating of 5/5Average rating of 5/5Average rating of 5/5
Summary: Excellent
Comment: Great book! Very informative. While reading, it reinforced what had been taught to me by my instructor. It was refreshing to know what has been passed down to me and to my students is the proper etiquette of traditional karate. Sad that so many of our Americanized karate-ka miss out on true traditions in the dojo.

Customer Rating: Average rating of 1/5Average rating of 1/5Average rating of 1/5Average rating of 1/5Average rating of 1/5
Summary: Not so good
Comment: Not so good book. Dave Lowry wrote only generally informations on etiquette, without details and specific informations.
Unfortunately this book is more blabby, folk, popular than sensible and useful, handy.
Pitty, because Lowry is a great man in martial arts and the role of etiquette in the dojo is so important and unkown to many martial artists...


Customer Rating: Average rating of 5/5Average rating of 5/5Average rating of 5/5Average rating of 5/5Average rating of 5/5
Summary: Insightful
Comment: Dave Lowry adds significant meaning to what happens in a dojo. His explanation of numerous Japanese words fosters the readers understanding of what karate is. He explains certain conjectures about karate, and when there is reason to dismiss some conjectures, he does so with perspicacious descriptions.

I particularly liked his explination of dojo. Do means way, as in karatedo, and jo means place. Dojo is "The place of the Way" which I find more meaningful than "practice hall". He has dozens of useful explanations of Japanese terms. The book is much more than a list of translations.

Customer Rating: Average rating of 3/5Average rating of 3/5Average rating of 3/5Average rating of 3/5Average rating of 3/5
Summary: Accurate, long winded and not always relevant, but enjoyable reading
Comment: Another entry into Lowry's remarkable esoteric library. While the information is undoubtedly correct, its relevance, even to those who practice Japanese martial arts, does not always seem relevant to martial artists in general, and the author's bias in favor of Japanese ethics, often in direct contrast to real events and circumstances, does not always make his work the most objective on the subject. If you practice Japanese martial arts, then this book would be of value to you, but if you practice any other type of martial arts, then its value is considerably lessened.

Customer Rating: Average rating of 4/5Average rating of 4/5Average rating of 4/5Average rating of 4/5Average rating of 4/5
Summary: Very imformative
Comment: I enjoyed the book and highlighted alot of pages that I found interesting. Alot of time was spent on areas that could have been shortened but, overall great book.


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