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Martial Arts for Women: A Practical Guide
List Price: $14.95
Our Price: $2.93
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Manufacturer: Turtle Press (CT)
Average Customer Rating: Average rating of 3.5/5Average rating of 3.5/5Average rating of 3.5/5Average rating of 3.5/5Average rating of 3.5/5

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Binding: Paperback
Dewey Decimal Number: 796.8082
EAN: 9781880336168
ISBN: 1880336162
Label: Turtle Press (CT)
Manufacturer: Turtle Press (CT)
Number Of Items: 1
Number Of Pages: 255
Publication Date: 1998-01-01
Publisher: Turtle Press (CT)
Studio: Turtle Press (CT)

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Editorial Reviews:

Martial Arts for Women

A one stop reference for women in the arts written by Jennifer Lawler. Includes advice on finding the right school, fitting into a male dominated atmosphere, finding the right equipment plus dozens of photos and detailed instruction on self-defense, sparring and conditioning techniques that work best for women.


Spotlight customer reviews:

Customer Rating: Average rating of 5/5Average rating of 5/5Average rating of 5/5Average rating of 5/5Average rating of 5/5
Summary: inspiring book
Comment: I am not a martial artist, yet MARTIAL ARTS FOR WOMEN: A Practical Guide both intrigued and entertained me. Lawler obviously has a zany sense of humor and the many personal anecdotes that she included in her text made MARTIAL ARTS FOR WOMEN a very enjoyable read. The chapter on self-defense contains plenty of practical information about self-defense techniques that any woman could use, even if she is not well-versed in martial arts. And the chapter on physical concerns includes many warm up exercises that would benefit any athlete, not just a martial artist. For someone like me, who is curious about martial arts but has no background in them, MARTIAL ARTS FOR WOMEN is a perfect beginner's book. Yet enough solid information is presented to satisfy the most avid female martial artist.

Customer Rating: Average rating of 4/5Average rating of 4/5Average rating of 4/5Average rating of 4/5Average rating of 4/5
Summary: A great martial arts guide for women.
Comment: Jennifer Lawler seems to be a proficient writer about martial arts. I had bought my wife the book about TKD and woman before we found this. The wife claims that both books are good but that this one answers more questions about what women face going into the martial arts. She has loaned it out which is always a good sign. I looked through it and wished that I had found it sooner. Worth buying.

Customer Rating: Average rating of 4/5Average rating of 4/5Average rating of 4/5Average rating of 4/5Average rating of 4/5
Summary: She's biased toward taekwondo, not against men
Comment: Lawler's book is definitely biased when it comes to martial arts styles--nearly every technique she describes or warning she gives is obviously more pertinent for taekwondo artists than for any other kind. But she puts her comments about troublesome male sparring partners clearly in context.

For example: "Certain guys at certain ages and at certain ranks develop an attitude problem toward women" (p. 132), and "even in the most female-friendly school [and Lawler does not equate *female-friendly* with *wimpy*], women occasionally encounter men who have a condescending or belittling attitude toward them" (p. 34).

Both the world of business and the world of martial arts are still mostly populated and run by men. Some female martial artists may never have to deal with prejudice against them, but again, if the pattern holds true, most of us women will at some point have the pleasure of being bullied or denigrated, even in the martial arts. I appreciate Lawler's attempt to put such negative experiences in context, and to give us some idea of how to deal with such a problem if (or when?) it arises.

Reviewer Keith Nelson ([email protected]) wilfully misinterpreted the "rib-cracking" incident. Lawler asserts that her sparring partner "kept walking into [her] reverse punch" (p. 69), but then takes full responsibility for not having enough control to keep from breaking his ribs anyway. She describes how "appalled" she was that she had allowed the injury to occur. She relates how she lost her nerve and was encouraged and coached by *both female and male* sparring partners until she got it back. Then (and only then, because Lawler herself didn't label this man as a bully until hearing it from other women), she reveals that the sparring partner she injured was notorious for sparring too hard with partners he felt were less capable than he was. He quit coming to classes after Lawler broke his ribs. She says:

"Occasionally, justice is served in the martial arts, and though I was still wrong and at fault for not using better control and for causing an injury, I felt oddly relieved. It was somehow appropriate that I, who didn't know the man's background, actually served to help him understand what it was like when your partner sparred too hard" (70).

It seems to me that Lawler took full responsibility for her own error, while acknowledging that bullying and inappropriate aggression lead only to trouble and should not be tolerated. She encourages women to take problems with bullying, etc., to their instructors first and foremost, and then describes other reasonable tactics women can use if their sparring partners refuse to follow the rules.

On the positive side, Lawler repeatedly encourages female martial artists to practice with both female and male martial artists, in order to develop a range of sparring abilities. She relates stories of positive experiences with both female and male sparring partners.

Summation: Maybe the book should have been titled "Tae Kwon Do for Women." That criticism seems justified. The "how dare she give women the impression that some men are bullies" criticism is just plain silly.


Customer Rating: Average rating of 2/5Average rating of 2/5Average rating of 2/5Average rating of 2/5Average rating of 2/5
Summary: Like all of Lawler's books: incomplete and biased.
Comment: [...] A martial arts novice could get better information by spending an hour or two on the internet.

Lawler is obviously very knowledgable about Tae Kwon Do, but like all her other books, her bias towards it is obvious and the misinformation hits you in the head like a round kick.

For the $ you spend on the book, you'd be better off picking up a bunch martial arts magazines at the grocery store or book store.


Customer Rating: Average rating of 5/5Average rating of 5/5Average rating of 5/5Average rating of 5/5Average rating of 5/5
Summary: inspiring book
Comment: I am not a martial artist, yet MARTIAL ARTS FOR WOMEN: A Practical Guide both intrigued and entertained me. Lawler obviously has a zany sense of humor and the many personal anecdotes that she included in her text made MARTIAL ARTS FOR WOMEN a very enjoyable read. The chapter on self-defense contains plenty of practical information about self-defense techniques that any woman could use, even if she is not well-versed in martial arts. And the chapter on physical concerns includes many warm up exercises that would benefit any athlete, not just a martial artist. For someone like me, who is curious about martial arts but has no background in them, MARTIAL ARTS FOR WOMEN is a perfect beginner's book. Yet enough solid information is presented to satisfy the most avid female martial artist


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