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CompleteMartialArts.com - Black Belt Tae Kwon Do: The Ultimate Reference Guide to the World's Most Popular Black Belt Martial Art

Black Belt Tae Kwon Do: The Ultimate Reference Guide to the World's Most Popular Black Belt Martial Art
List Price: $16.95
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Manufacturer: Checkmark Books
Average Customer Rating: Average rating of 4.5/5Average rating of 4.5/5Average rating of 4.5/5Average rating of 4.5/5Average rating of 4.5/5

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Binding: Paperback
Dewey Decimal Number: 796.8153
EAN: 9780816042418
ISBN: 0816042411
Label: Checkmark Books
Manufacturer: Checkmark Books
Number Of Items: 1
Number Of Pages: 272
Publication Date: 2000-06
Publisher: Checkmark Books
Studio: Checkmark Books

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Editorial Reviews:

Designed to meet the needs of students who have mastered the basics and come up through the ranks of the lower-level belts, Black Belt Tae Kwon Do offers everything readers need to complete their training, from advanced sparring to breaking techniques. Following the format of its predecessor (Tae Kwon Do: The Ultimate Reference Guide to the World's Most Popular Martial Art, Updated Edition, 1999. ISBN 0-8160-3839-2), it combines a complete explanation of the physical aspects of the martial art with a full description of the philosophical elements of its training. Among the topics covered are: practice, warm-up, and advanced techniques and forms; self-defense techniques; and sparring strategies and techniques. Extensive appendixes include a special section on opening a successful Tae Kwon Do school; official rules of competition; and weight classes, governing bodies, and international organizations and associations. Two glossaries translate terms from English to Korean and Korean to English.


Spotlight customer reviews:

Customer Rating: Average rating of 5/5Average rating of 5/5Average rating of 5/5Average rating of 5/5Average rating of 5/5
Summary: Awesome Reference Guide
Comment: Note: I wouldn't suggest that anyone try using this book (or its companion for the first eight forms) without an instructor. Learn your forms at the Do Jang. I find, though, that my Master shows me a form, but when I get home I find myself stuck on a detail. These books are excellent for refreshing my memory.

When I got the books I took them to show my 7th dan WTF Master. Not only did he say they were great books, but he was friends with two of the authors. That reassured me that the books must be accurate. He wouldn't recommend one if he thought I'd learn something incorrectly!

Customer Rating: Average rating of 5/5Average rating of 5/5Average rating of 5/5Average rating of 5/5Average rating of 5/5
Summary: Helps Out
Comment: Mr. Park has created a great set of books for any Tae Kwon Do student. It has really helped me when learning or reviewing forms.

Customer Rating: Average rating of 4/5Average rating of 4/5Average rating of 4/5Average rating of 4/5Average rating of 4/5
Summary: good reference book for WTF forms
Comment: This is a good reference book to have on one's shelf. It offers good advice in the matters of teaching others and operating a quality school. It clearly illustrates (with photos and text) all the currently approved WTF black belt forms and some advanced sparring techniques. In my opinion however, most of the sparring techniques discussed do not utilise the tighter, more streamlined kicks available to the taekwondoist.

Customer Rating: Average rating of 5/5Average rating of 5/5Average rating of 5/5Average rating of 5/5Average rating of 5/5
Summary: Excellent book on TKD
Comment: First, you should know this book is for the WTF style and forms, not the ITF, which is different. But whatever style you practice, all told, about 40 million people in 167 countries do TKD, making it probably the world's most popular martial art.

I am mainly a karate, kung fu, and escrima practitioner and teacher these days, but I also have a black belt in TKD, and learned many of my most important lessons and basics from first studying TKD. My teacher was the great Ju Hwarn Kwark, who very few people know of, but he was possibly the greatest kicker and puncher I've ever seen, and I've seen a lot.

The book starts with a brief history of TKD, the presents two brief chapters on basic techniques, prearranged sparring, and advanced techniques. The author discusses its popularity as a sport and much of the book seems aimed at helping a prospective instructor become competent enough to open his own school.

Most of the book, however, is devoted to the forms. In fact, 142 pages of the book is just on that. So if you're looking for a book mainly on sparring and practical techniques this might not be for you, although there's a good chapter on that after the forms.

There is also a section on self-defense, and several useful appendices, including rules of competition, weight divisions, referee signs, and a glossary of terms.

One little piece of trivia. You may notice that the stepping pattern of the last form, Il Yo, follows a Swast_ka pattern--except the Oriental version of this is the reverse of the N_zi one. In fact, this symbol on maps in Japan denotes a Buddhist temple, and is a common Buddhist symbol.



Customer Rating: Average rating of 4/5Average rating of 4/5Average rating of 4/5Average rating of 4/5Average rating of 4/5
Summary: Not a black belt yet ?...
Comment: ...come back later, then. This books seems aimed at the black belt athlete who is considering teaching Tae Kwon Do and maybe opening his own dojan. It covers all the aspects of TKD training, from warm up to philosophy to sparring techniques. Its forms session is very thorough and clear. Every TKD instructor should have a copy inside his do bok.


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